Chief Eufaula – Creek Indian Removal

SIZE
19' Long by 11' High

COMPLETION DATE
Summer 1993

ARTIST NAME
Bruce Rickett

TALKING POINTS

  • In 1836, the decision was made to remove the Indians from their reservation in Alabama to Indian lands in Oklahoma.
  • On their march to Oklahoma, Chief Eufaula visited the State Capitol, which was then in Tuscaloosa, and addressed the Alabama legislature.
  • “I come here, brothers, to see the great house of Alabama, and the men who make the law, and to say farewell in brotherly kindness before I go to the far West, where my people are now going… We leave behind our good will to the people of Alabama who build the great houses, and to the men who make the laws. This all I have to say.”

The government gave the Creek Indians a reservation in Alabama that ran along the Chattahoochee River almost the entire length of the state. In 1836, the decision was made to remove the Indians from this desirable farm land, and move them to Indian lands in Oklahoma. On their march to Oklahoma, the chief of the Creek Indians, a man named Yoholo-Micco (white men called him Chief Eufaula) visited the State Capitol, which was then in Tuscaloosa, and addressed the Alabama legislature. The mural depicts Chief Eufaula as he looked, according to the only drawings available, when he spoke to the legislature before leading the last of the Lower Creeks to the reservation in Oklahoma:

“I come here, brothers, to see the great house of Alabama, and the men who make the law, and to say farewell in brotherly kindness before I go to the far West, where my people are now going.”

“In these lands of Alabama, which have belonged to my forefathers, and where their bones lay buried, I see that the Indian fires are going out. Soon they will be cold. New fires are lighting in the West for us, they say, and we will go there. I do not believe our Great Father means to harm his red children, but that he wishes us well. We leave behind our good will to the people of Alabama who build the great houses, and to the men who make the laws. This all I have to say.”

An historic marker was erected at Old Creek Town Park in Eufaula as a tribute to Chief Eufaula and the charity that was within his heart when he spoke these words.