The Abduction of Elizabeth Stewart Dill

SIZE
N/A

COMPLETION DATE
December 1993

ARTIST NAME
Art Rosenbaum

TALKING POINTS

  • Around 1817, a large boat carrying supplies from Mobile to the army in Fort Scott and Fort Hughes in Decatur Co. Georgia, was also carrying Elizabeth Stewart, the fiancée of a sergeant who was traveling by land with the troops.
  • The hostile Creeks attacked the boat from a canebrake near the bank, killing or wounding most of those on board.
  • The Indians captured Elizabeth Stewart and held her until a party of soldiers and friendly Indians recaptured her some time later.
  • Elizabeth Stewart later married John Dill, and settled in Ft. Gaines, Georgia where their home, The Dill House, still stands today as a bed and breakfast, and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Around 1817, the Florida Indians were having frequent skirmishes with the troops who were protecting the white settlers.

A large boat carrying supplies from Mobile to the army in Fort Scott and Fort Hughes in Decatur Co. Georgia, was also carrying Elizabeth Stewart, the fiancée of a sergeant who was traveling by land with the troops.

The hostile Creeks attacked the boat from a canebrake near the bank, killing or wounding most of those on board. During the fight, a Sgt. MacIntosh, who was a very large and strong man, brought a small cannon on deck and set it off while holding it under his arm.

The blast temporarily cleared the Indians from the boat, but Sgt. MacIntosh was blown overboard and drowned.

The Indians captured Elizabeth Stewart and held her until a party of soldiers and friendly Indians recaptured her some time later. One of the Indian captors was particularly captivated by Elizabeth’s strawberry blonde hair and wanted to keep her as his wife.

Elizabeth Stewart later married John Dill, and settled in Ft. Gaines, Georgia where their home, The Dill House, on Washington Street, still stands today as a bed and breakfast, and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.